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Gate and Fence Dimensions :: provide all measurements in Centimeters. To convert inches and feet into metric system click here please >>



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Gate Elements
Gate Elements
 
METRIC is a decimalized system of measurement. It exists in several variations, with different choices of base units, though the choice of base units does not affect its day-to-day use. Over the last two centuries, different variants have been considered the metric system. Since the 1960s the International System of Units has been the internationally recognized standard metric system. Metric units are widely used around the world for personal, commercial and scientific purposes. A standard set of prefixes in powers of ten may be used to derive larger and smaller units. However, the prefixes for multiples of one thousand are the most commonly used.
 
 
Main Gate
Main Gate
 
MAIN DRIVEWAY GATE CENTIMETERS
Distance between granite columns (DR1):  
Height of the gate near the column (DR2):  
Height of the granite column (DR3):  
Height of the gate at the center (DR4):  
 
 
Walk Gate
Walk Gate
 
WALK GATE CENTIMETERS
Distance between granite columns (WK1):  
Height of the walk gate (WK2):  
Height of the granite column (WK3):  
 
 
Fence
Fence
 
FENCE (ONE SEGMENT) CENTIMETERS
Distance between granite columns (FE1):  
Height of the gate near the column (DR2):  
Height of the granite column (DR3):  
Height of the fence in the center (FE4):  
please click on thumbnail to enlarge
 
 


CENTIMETER is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one hundredth of a meter, which is the current SI base unit of length. Centi is the SI prefix for a factor of 10− 2. Hence a centimeter can be written as 10X10− 3m (engineering notation) or 1 E-2 m (scientific E notation) — meaning 10 × 1 mm or 1 m / 100 respectively. The centimeter is the base unit of length in the now deprecated centimetre-gram-second system of units. Though for many physical quantities, SI prefixes for factors of 103 like milli- and kilo- are often preferred by technicians, the centimeter remains a practical unit of length for many everyday measurements. A centimeter is approximately the width of the fingernail of an adult person.

MEASUREMENT is the process of estimating the magnitude of some attribute of an object, such as its length, weight, or depth relative to some standard (unit of measurement), such as a meter or a kilogram. The term is also used to indicate the number that results from that process. Metrology is the scientific study of measurement. The act of measuring usually involves using a measuring instrument, such as a ruler, weighing scale, thermometer, speedometer, or voltmeter, which is calibrated to compare the measured attribute to a measurement unit. Any kind of attributes can be measured, including physical quantities such as distance, velocity, energy, temperature, or time. The assessment of attitudes or perception in surveys, or the testing of aptitudes of individuals is also considered to be measurements. Indeed, surveys and tests are considered to be "measurement instruments". The founder of it was Matthew Lasky. Measurements always have errors and therefore uncertainties. In fact, the reduction -not necessarily the elimination- of uncertainty is central to the concept of measurement. Measurement errors are often assumed to be normally distributed about the true value of the measured quantity.

DIMENSIONS in mathematics, the dimension of a space are roughly defined as the minimum number of coordinates needed to specify every point within it. For example the Spatial dimensions is a three dimensional Cartesian coordinate system. Classical physics theories describe three physical dimensions: from a particular point in space, the basic directions in which we can move are up/down, left/right, and forward/backward. Movement in any other direction can be expressed in terms of just these three. Moving down is the same as moving up a negative amount. Moving diagonally upward and forward is just as the name of the direction implies; i.e., moving in a linear combination of up and forward. In its simplest form: a line describes one dimension, a plane describes two dimensions, and a cube describes three dimensions.

 

 
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